Hammermen Whisky Tasting

The Hammermen recently enjoyed a fabulous whisky tasting at the Allan Park Hotel courtesy of Calum McMillan whose theme for the evening was “A walk on the light side”

IMG_0801 (Copy)Calum started with “Haig Club” – a new single grain whisky from Diageo’s Cameronbridge distillery, the oldest grain distillery in Scotland.  It is a combination of grain whisky from three different types of cask. It is designed for those new to whisky and went down well with the participants.

Calum then moved onto “anCnoc” – an Highland malt whisky distilled in Knockdhu distillery  in the North East of Scotland. It opened in 1895 in the small village of Knock.

IMG_0807 (Copy)The half way point was reached with “Inchgower”,  a Banffshire single malt whisky produced just outside Buckie  since 1871. One of the major components of “Bells” whisky.

“Glen Elgin” was then sampled, a single malt produced in the heart of Speyside just 3 miles south of Elgin, the last distillery to be built during the boom years of the 1890’s.

The penultimate single malt whisky was Cardhu. Started by a farmers wife Helen Cumming on Cardhu farm in 1811. The illicit still finally became legal in 1824 and the distillery went from strength to strength.

IMG_0798 (Copy)The final whisky tasted was “Singleton Sunray”, a single malt whisky from Dufftown aged in American Oak ex-bourbon casks.

All members appreciated the evening and thanked Calum for his depth of knowledge and insight into the whiskys tasted.

 

 

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About Seven Incorporated Trades of Stirling

The power to grant incorporated status to trades rested with the magistrates of royal burghs. An incorporated trade was granted the right to monopolise and control their trade within the burgh. Trade Incorporations were usually constituted by a seal of cause granted by the magistrates but some were constituted by use and consuetude. A strict monopoly was enforced within the burgh and non-members of an incorporation were not allowed to trade within the bounds of the town.
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